Share information about reloading the 22 TCM cartridge
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By digitcontrol
#11943 Dungheap, I agree he is reasonable for the work involved, but for a cent or two more you could buy new TCM brass.
So i guess that if reformed .223 was of higher quality brass then factory Armscor then it would be a bargain?????
Anyway back to the trouble of reforming brass. I have done a few sample pieces with mixed results. First attempt was cutting the .223 shorter, deburr, lube & run thru sizing die, result was creased necks, splits or bulged shoulders.
Second attempt was cut brass, deburr, anneal, lube & size, worked better but I believe as some others on this forum in the past comments have suggested would give better results is as follows.
Clean, lube, Full length resize brass in .223 die, cut to length, deburr, anneal, lube, size in TCM die & trim to length. Yes, its considerable work and perhaps overkill, but if you found certain .223 brass to be of better quality & reload more times before neck splits then it's a good deal.
In my case I bought factory TCM brass, annealed, sized & trimmed before loading. I use damaged .223 brass from friends that shoot AR-15's for making extra TCM brass, which are loaded as separate batches from the factory brass.
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By dungheap
#11948 I'm gradually working on sizing the cut off .223 cases in steps. I run them into a .32 H&R sizer down to the point of touching the shoulder, then into a cut-down 7mm BR sizing die, and am now working on something to get them down to 6mm before running into the .22 TCM FL sizer. This may or may not work, but I've done that a lot over time with other calibers and it worked fine. And, I never annealed a case before starting to monkey with the .22 TCM.

On the other hand, I bought 400 rounds of factory .22 TCM brass, 300+ of which are still in the bags. Partial neck sizing cases without annealing has worked just fine for me, and I've only lost a few to neck splits after multiple firings with some pretty stout loads.
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By SidecarMike
#11951 I agree that it's a lot of fooling around when you can buy new stuff. I started out with 100 factory cases. I'm finding that I can only get 3 or sometimes 4 loads out of factory brass before I experience split necks. My 223s have been loaded 6 times now without losing a single case to splitting. Maybe I got a bad batch of brass. Eventually I'll try some more, but for now, I'll continue making my own.
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By LizardKing1545
#11953
wood chucker wrote:They should.
What aint going right ?


I didn't take out the decapping pin. Rookie mistake. I made a few but the necks are too small in diameter and I can't get my trimming piece into the neck. When I put the decapping pin back in the die to size the neck, it smashes the case down. I have tried annealed and non annealed cases with the same results.
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By catchbull@4
#11983 Lizard king
Hornady dies are way better than Lee for forming tcm. The vent hole placement doesn't scar the neck like the Lee, and the expanding/decapping stem is way longer than the Lee. What is key to forming, is to run the expanded down so the decapping pin is about 1/2" below the die. You'll have to play with so that the expander only contacts the neck on the down stroke. That will give you the proper neck inside diameter for reaming and turning. I use the rcbs neck turning tool with a reaming pilot. Depending on your chamber, you may be able to get away without turning and reaming but you will have the "dreaded donut" at the shoulder/neck transition. Without turning, your necks will be a bit thick (around .015-.016) and probably not real uniform. With the Lee I had to anneal twice to get a decent case, but with the hornady, I just cut the 223 to 1.045 and form. I do anneal after forming just to extend case life and prevent stress corrosion cracking. Good luck
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By LizardKing1545
#12012
catchbull@4 wrote:Lizard king
Hornady dies are way better than Lee for forming tcm. The vent hole placement doesn't scar the neck like the Lee, and the expanding/decapping stem is way longer than the Lee. What is key to forming, is to run the expanded down so the decapping pin is about 1/2" below the die. You'll have to play with so that the expander only contacts the neck on the down stroke. That will give you the proper neck inside diameter for reaming and turning. I use the rcbs neck turning tool with a reaming pilot. Depending on your chamber, you may be able to get away without turning and reaming but you will have the "dreaded donut" at the shoulder/neck transition. Without turning, your necks will be a bit thick (around .015-.016) and probably not real uniform. With the Lee I had to anneal twice to get a decent case, but with the hornady, I just cut the 223 to 1.045 and form. I do anneal after forming just to extend case life and prevent stress corrosion cracking. Good luck


Thank you so much for the information!
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By Waccamaw
#13945 I ordered forming dies from hornadys custom shop and they work great. It is a 2 die set.I can form a .223 case down to a tcm case without cutting down or annealing.I have formed 1000 plus and have not lost the first case yet. Happy trails.
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By dungheap
#13946 How 'bout a little more info on this -- SKU; how many dies; what does each do; and how much $$, and what's your process, step by step? Interesting, but I have to wonder if it's really worth it.
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By Waccamaw
#13953 In response to Mr Heaps request: 2 die set from hornadys custom shop can be ordered from Mr Ben Syring at 800 338 3220 ext # 261 for $200.
Brass is formed befor cutting down or annealing.
All my brass prep is done on a rcbs Rock chucker.
Die #1 forms the .223 neck to .308. Die #2 takes it down to .260
Steps:# 1 clean brass
#2 Spray with Dillon lube
# 3 decap
#4 swage
#5 run a batch through forming die #1
#6 run through forming die #2
#7 place 10 pcs in home made jig and trim to1.075 on band saw
#8 trim to 1.065 on drill press with Forster power trimmer
#9 run through sizing die with decapping/expander rod in
#10 back to drill press,trim to 1.020 with a .220 as a pilot to ream
#11 clean Dillon lube off
#12 spray with hornady one shot lube
#13 dump brass into case feeder of Dillon 650 and load
I anneal after firing first time
I find the home made brass to be accurate
I have a fs pistol
Is it worth the cost and time? It is to me , I am 65 and enjoy loading and shooting.I have been reloading since 1985.
This is my procedure: this is for reference only.
Mileage may very
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By MK111
#13958 What parts do you use on the Dillon 650 that differ from 223? Seems like the case feed would have to be changed and also the powder drop bushing. The small pistol case feeder wheel should work-correct?
Getting ready to load 22 TCM.