Share information about reloading the 22 TCM cartridge
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By Overtrim
#1562
Handloader109 wrote:Oh, I said to go read......... Here is a link to one of the definitive sources........
http://www.6mmbr.com/annealing.html

Go read it all. And read testing section on over and under annealing and then section on testing.
Let's be careful the 22TCM is quite a high pressure cartridge. Have a good weekend guys. Go shoot! I gotta work.


Thanks for the explanation and link. Even though I reloaded all of my hunting ammo in the past, I have no plans to reload the TCM or other pistol rounds at this time.
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By chefreiss1
#1563 I guess I should have said, "when the case neck begins to glow reddish orange, tip it over into the water" and not wait till it is cherry red. It is just in my experience that some cases, small ones like the .22 TCM, will become "cherry" very quickly. However the statement about not evenly heating the cases with the method I use in the article referenced by Handloader109, is pure bunk and only a way of selling these annealing machines. I have done this for over 36 years with not good, but excellent results. I fault not Handloader109 :) for I don't think his intention was to de-bunk my method, but to only offer more info good or bad about annealing. I did not find the article without merit for it did have some good information. But when one of the authors is selling annealing machines, you always have to question the content of the article.
The annealing process I described works really well and when there are so many other thing to buy such as ammo, more brass , bullet, powder and so on, I personally find it a waste of money to invest in an annealing machine. But maybe I am just a grumpy old man, you know I had a sergeant very early in my career who had a saying, "You know everyone has an opinion, but only mine is right". omg
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By Handloader109
#1566 Oh, no issue, as I said, I've quickly learned that there is always more than one way to skin a cat yarr
I have seen some cases not split length wise, but around the circumference and a separation occurring. (not the 22TCM) sounds like it could have been from over annealing the case. Yeah the guy did sell his Machine, but I didn't really take his comments too negatively about heating without turning. Said it worked. Now I spent about $18 and a couple of hours Making mine, and he did show some cheap alternatives. If it were me, I'd keep temp lower just to be on safe side..... Shoot On!
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By chefreiss1
#1569
Handloader109 wrote:Oh, no issue, as I said, I've quickly learned that there is always more than one way to skin a cat yarr
I have seen some cases not split length wise, but around the circumference and a separation occurring. (not the 22TCM) sounds like it could have been from over annealing the case. Yeah the guy did sell his Machine, but I didn't really take his comments too negatively about heating without turning. Said it worked. Now I spent about $18 and a couple of hours Making mine, and he did show some cheap alternatives. If it were me, I'd keep temp lower just to be on safe side..... Shoot On!


Well said, no issues here. Hope to see you at the range one day!
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By DurangoKid
#1632 I made a few .22 TCM cases early on. Could not find my .224 reamer and was unable to complete the project correctly. The .22 TCM brass was very available and the factory loads are selling for $25 dollars a box. No need for the extra work making the brass.
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By Handloader109
#1672 Shot up about a box of my various reloads today, mainly my cast, lubed and some powder coated. They were all converted cases and none show splits or damage. So maybe I have it down. Yeah, oem is still cheap, I'll not be making many cases when I can use std brass. But it is good alternative if I can't get ammo....
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By chefreiss1
#1675 Since the case walls are generally thicker below the neck, are you finding it necessary to ream the inside walls of the new neck in order to get good bullet fit without bulging out the neck? The neck walls have to be thicker, especially if your are using mil-spec brass. I know I have found it necessary to do so when making .30 Herrett from .30-30 cases and so on. Please let us know your experience on this. :)
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By Handloader109
#1684 What I have found is that in making the cases, I've done it two ways, sized without the inner punch and then again with punch to thin out the neck, or once with the punch installed. Second method is best, but I can't do it on my 650xl. Shell plate was damaged after doing 50-60 of them. Lot of force required. Went back to my Lee Ss. I did ream a bit before sizing.
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By tinkertoy92
#1699 I made a bunch a couple months ago before discovering this forum, and I didn't get them even glowing orange- I heated them with a propane torch for about ten seconds a piece and then tipped them... it worked but I had to run them through the press pretty hard- I have since had my little brother who is borrowing my 22tcm while I'm in Europe switch to using an actual cutting touch with a wide angle tip. What I am told also works that I haven't tried yet is taking your lead melter (for those of you that also cast bullets) and holding the case head with a pair of pliers and dip the front 1/4 in the case in the molten lead, letting it soak in the molten lead for a couple seconds, and then pulling it and dumping it in a quenching bucket (the lead won't stick to non lead metals). I'll post results to this method the next time I'm stateside in January... the only other input I have on this topic is that a jewellers chopsaw from harbor freight ($25) with a sharpie mark on its vice at the proper length to cut the cases is invaluable for this process